Colleton Crescent

Colleton Crescent

The Colleton Crescent collection of houses has been unconditionally loved and taken care of since its creation by Mathew Nosworthy on 3rd of September 1802.
The detailing around the doors is called ‘coade stone’, a type of ceramic, invented in Exeter by Eleanor Coade. Louisa Colleton laid the first foundation stone on 3rd September 1802 building the House currently numbered “Five” at first. The crescent is named after John Colleton who introduced in 1937, a species of magnolia to England, the mayor Thomas Floud chose to name the crescent.

It has experienced a rich history since then including a number of filming, painting and even housed a theatre. The houses have been in the filming of Rosamunde Pilcher novel, 2002 and the Onedin Line, a BBC drama production and The Hound of the Baskervilles, 1982.

The houses contain antique mirrors, flock wallpaper, and views across the quay, oval windows on each landing, rather like the inside of a lighthouse, it must be one of the most opulent rooms in town. The crescent was also often used by the military for parades and assemblies on special occasions. On the 75th birthday of George III in June 1813 it was reported, "At noon the Royal Artillery fired a royal salute of 21 guns in front of Colleton Crescent....".